Q and A time

I don’t think I’ve ever snagged a Q and A before but I couldn’t help it when I read this post by Karen from NothingButKnit.

Her knitting mojo (and mine) is on vacation and she thought this Q and A might help find it.  Feel free to answer* regardless of your craft: knitting, crocheting, sewing, painting, photography, or whatever you enjoy…

  1. What technique were you surprised that you enjoyed?
  2. What technique do you want to love but don’t?
  3. What is your favorite item to make?
  4. You’re only allowed to knit with one yarn weight forever. What weight is it and why?
  5. What item that you made is your all time favorite?

My answers:

  1. Colorwork.  My first colorwork project was the Traveler’s Pocket by Nancy Bush.  I LOVED doing colorwork so much that I designed my own pattern based on her design.
  2. Hmmm.  I’m weird in that I’m not a fan of knitting with circular needles but I use them.  In fact I’ll be trying the 2-at-a-time sock technique soon.
  3. Socks.  And shawls are a close second.
  4. Fingering weight as it is so versatile.  It can be held double or triple to make a different weight.
  5. My Dots and Stripes purse is my all time favorite.  My first pair of socks is my second.

*Answer in the comments or link to your blog.  Thanks!

 

Down the tubes

I was cleaning up my knitting bag and had to come up with another plan for all my double-pointed needles (aka dpns).  I’m not a Magic Loop convert yet so most of my socks and other knitted-in-the-round items are made using dpns.

I know I bought some of these but I also inherited some.  In the beginning, the needles were safe and organized in the original cardboard packaging.  Then the packaging fell apart. 

The inherited needles were held together with rubber bands or tape (Gasp!).  Rubber bands deteriorate rather quickly and leave gunk on the needles.  And tape residue is sticky and rough. 

I made some holders from small paper envelopes and wrote the sizes on the front.  That worked for awhile but it wasn’t a fantastic solution. 

Enter these double point needle tubes*!  

I love them. 

Now my needles have a more secure home.  I cut out some circles (address labels), wrote the size and stuck them on the end so I can see at a glance what needle I have/need. 

The tubes are adjustable so they can accommodate shorter or longer needles.  I even keep some crochet hooks in one as every knitter sometimes needs one of those. 

They now live in the knitting bag of tools and supplies.

Sets of size 10 1/2 and above are too large to fit inside these tubes so until the Super Duper Sized tubes arrive, I will keep them in my make-shift holder. 

I’m not sure how I ended up with so many size 8 dpns.  But can one really have too many? 

*I received no compensation for this review.  I just like this product and thought you might, too.

Selling myself short

Jude commented on Casting off another way

 

First of all….those look VERY complicated to even think about doing. You are excellent at your craft. Those mitts should be worth about 80$ or more if someone were to purchase them.!!!

I do it all the time.  Well, when someone asks me to knit something for them and then asks how much I would charge.

I had no problem coming up with a price for a crocheted item a friend of mine made for someone else.  She asked me for my opinion and said with the time invested and cost of the yarn, I wouldn’t charge less than $35.  And she did.  And the person paid the price.

A friend commissioned me to make the Drinkers Mitts for her and I gave her a price.  A very low price. It’s not high enough for the amount of work involved but I felt bad charging what I would charge a complete stranger.

Do you charge a flat fee?  Do you use some type of formula to come up with a price?  Or do you sell yourself short?