Coasting again

I needed something easy and quick to knit while dealing with my shingles so I bought Very Pink’s Shaker Dishcloth and Coaster pattern.

I love it!

I have way too much worsted weight cotton yarn and this was the perfect project to use it with.

I goofed and used a larger needle than suggested so my first coaster (the purple and yellow one) was larger than the others.  And even with the correct needle size, mine still ended up a half-inch larger than the pattern/gauge.  What can I say?  I must knit looser.  

But I don’t care.  They will be perfect for our house.

 

Deep breath

What do the roof and I have in common?

Shingles.

This is the second time I’ve had to deal with this nastiness.  The first time it was a mild outbreak on my face and scalp.

This time it’s on my side/back right around the center of my torso.  A certain undergarment is impossible to wear at the moment so I’m staying home wearing very loose-fitting, soft cotton t-shirts.  When I move, my left arm is held away from my side to keep anything from touching the red, itching/burning, blistered, extremely painful, angry skin.

To keep my mind off the discomfort, I am knitting a pair of Align Mitts commissioned by a friend. I began the first one on Friday and I just need to bind off the top and finish the thumb.  

I usually do  the Elizabeth Zimmerman’s sewn bind-off or the JSSBO.  But this time I’m learning a new bind-off that is stretchy and doesn’t flare out: The Invisible Ribbed Bind Off for 1×1 Rib by Liat Gat.  I just need to take a deep breath….watch the video and and read the directions.

Q and A time

I don’t think I’ve ever snagged a Q and A before but I couldn’t help it when I read this post by Karen from NothingButKnit.

Her knitting mojo (and mine) is on vacation and she thought this Q and A might help find it.  Feel free to answer* regardless of your craft: knitting, crocheting, sewing, painting, photography, or whatever you enjoy…

  1. What technique were you surprised that you enjoyed?
  2. What technique do you want to love but don’t?
  3. What is your favorite item to make?
  4. You’re only allowed to knit with one yarn weight forever. What weight is it and why?
  5. What item that you made is your all time favorite?

My answers:

  1. Colorwork.  My first colorwork project was the Traveler’s Pocket by Nancy Bush.  I LOVED doing colorwork so much that I designed my own pattern based on her design.
  2. Hmmm.  I’m weird in that I’m not a fan of knitting with circular needles but I use them.  In fact I’ll be trying the 2-at-a-time sock technique soon.
  3. Socks.  And shawls are a close second.
  4. Fingering weight as it is so versatile.  It can be held double or triple to make a different weight.
  5. My Dots and Stripes purse is my all time favorite.  My first pair of socks is my second.

*Answer in the comments or link to your blog.  Thanks!

 

Another knitter in the family

Mr. Aitch and I visited with our son and his family while on our vacation

This was the first time that we met our daughter-in-law in person.  She is a delight, very down to earth, generous, super nice and a knitter.

She and I were both pleasantly surprised to learn that we were both knitters.

When my grandmother taught me to knit, it was (what I’ve since discovered) in the “cottage” style of knitting where the knitter would prop the right needle against their hip/waist/underarm for support and move the left needle.  Circular needles don’t offer that type of support.  Dpns don’t really allow for that either as they are usually 5-8 inches long.  Plus they are pretty thin (US 0-2) and very pointy.  Sometimes I stick one end of the dpn into a wine cork so I can still support the sharp point against my body and not poke holes through my clothes (or skin).  I just need to remember to move it as I knit from one needle to the next.

My daughter-in-law has mastered the two-at-a-time socks on circular needles.  I am a double point needle (dpn) sock knitter, however, I want to learn this technique.  During our visit, she gave me two sock knitting books:

The Sock à la Carte (c) 2008 by Jonelle Raffino, Katherine Cade and the SWTC Staff is so unique. 

The book has 17 cuff patterns, 20 body patterns and 18 heel and toe patterns that one can mix and match to create hundreds of different socks.

Part of the book contains flip pages to design your own unique combinations for the cuff, body, heel and toe that refer back to the directions for each section.

The other book 2-at-a-Time Socks (c) 2007 by Melissa Morgan-Oates explains the technique so well that I am going to give it a go. 

With 17 sock patterns included (and the patterns in the other book), I will have many to choose from for my first pair…just as soon as I finish more on my To-Do list.

Are you a sock knitter?  Do you use double point needles, circular needles, 2-at-a-time, or knit flat socks and seam?