I bought some

Blocking wires that is.

The packet is quite small but then these are the flexible wires that don’t use up a lot of space when not in use.

This is the mixed set that includes 3 – 70-inch wires, 4 – 35-inch wires and 30 T-pins.

I’ve already blocked another neck wrap with them and they are a delight to use.

These were ordered from Miss Babs.  As a welcoming gift, she included three stitch markers…

…and a cute ten-yard twist of this gorgeous yarn.

One day I’ll even buy some of her hand-dyed yarns.  They are all so beautiful!

Such a bother

I cut the tip of my index finger on my right hand last week and I can’t seem to get anything done…well, stuff that I want to do.

It’s not a deep cut or a long cut just the sort that gets in the way because it needs covered.  

I’m an English style knitter where the yarn is held in my right hand as opposed to a continental style where the yarn is held in the left hand.  I “can” knit continental but it’s not that intuitive for me.  Or fun.  Plus I have one more fingerless mitt to finish and my gauge would definitely be off if I changed styles now.  And bandages just get in the way.  So no knitting for me.

But I could dye some yarn…

Quilt inspiration

Lowes logo

Inspiration struck me at my local Lowe’s store last week. I stopped in my tracks when I saw these huge posters of snowflakes.


Not just any snowflakes.


Huge, colorful snowflakes.


Huge, colorful snowflakes that could become a quilt.


Another customer saw me snapping these pictures with my phone and looked at me like I was wacky.  But that stop me from explaining how I saw the snowflakes as possible patchwork quilts.

After looking at them for a few seconds, he agreed with me.  And walked away rather quickly.

Inspiration in an unusual place.

Have you been inspired by anything unusual?

Final tidbits

For your information I was not too enamored with history while I was in school until I had two wonderful professors in college.

Dr. Collins taught Art History at WVU in the early-mid 1970s and I was fortunate to have him as one of my instructors.  Our class was in an interior room of the Creative Arts Center which was cool and dark, just perfect for showing slides of art works.  Along with the cool, darkness, Dr. Collins’ soothing voice allowed some students to think that was the perfect opportunity for a mid-afternoon nap.  But not me.  Instead of just mentioning the painter or sculptor and the name of the art work, he also included some tidbit of information about the artist, obvious as well as not so obvious details about the work, the political and religious atmosphere of the times, and the reactions of the world to each piece.  His dry sense of humor was evident and he interjected his commentary with it daily.  I learned so much about the history of the era we were studying and not just about ART history.

The other professor, whose name I do not remember, was just as fascinating.  Ancient History was dull and boring, or so I thought.  He brought it to life by talking about the everyday people of the time, the culture, the wars, the food, the floods, and how it all related not only to that time but how it related to the present.

Neither class was dull or boring.  It wasn’t solely focused on specific generals, dates, places, and battles.  History was real and about real, everyday people.

I don’t even know if the schools teach real history any more.  And that’s too bad.



“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”  George Santayana