Not a knitting project

Two years ago we had our old wooden deck replaced with composite decking. We have two levels of deck and the lower section is about 12 x 15 feet. For some reason, I never posted about it. Anyway, the contractor used the existing framing to save on the costs. Unfortunately, the framing wasn’t what it should have been so the decking sagged under the weight of our wooden picnic table and grill that we use on that lower section. Not a lot but enough to be concerned about.

The old wooden deck

I had been thinking of how to fix the sagginess since last summer. So last week, I decided I would beef up the framing on the lower deck before it got too hot out.

New joists are on the left, and two more are needed on the right.

I removed the decking in one afternoon. Then I added joist hangers and new 2 x 6 lumber in between the existing joists so the support would be every 12 inches instead of every 24 inches.

Section 1 finished. That’s a root on the right, not a snake!
Section 2 joists finished!

The part that took the longest was putting the decking back on. There are special (and of course pricy) brackets that fit into the grooves on the sides of the decking boards so no screws or nails are visible on the top. It’s really neat and clean-looking. The issue was getting the brackets (I added more) and the grooves to line up so the boards would just slide in.

By the time I got to the last board, I discovered that it was too wide. Not getting the boards snugged up as tightly as the original installation was the problem. A fraction of an inch over the span of 30 boards added up. I managed to rip the last board down and get it in place.

I think this will hold an elephant!

I had some uneven stones as a kind of step off the one side but will find* someone (who knows what they are doing) to redo that area with some leftover pavers from another project to make a transition from the grass to the deck.

All in all, this took twice as long to do as I originally planned thought. Plus I was still recovering from that nasty virus. More clean-up is needed but the heavy labor part for me is done…for now.

*I don’t know what it’s like in your neck of the woods but trying to find someone, anyone around here to do work is next to impossible. I know most of the projects/jobs aren’t huge but does no one need money or to work anymore?

Patti

Goodbye, Walking Buddy

My Walking Buddy had to leave. It was her time.

I hadn’t seen her since last December but we would text and talk on the phone. I knew she wasn’t doing well when I received her last text on April 30. I wished her well and told her I’d continue to pray for her.

Her funeral was yesterday and her family knew who I was though I had only met a couple of them a few times last summer. Every day that we walked we talked about our families. I knew their names and where they lived. And when I saw them at the funeral home, it was like we were old friends.

My Walking Buddy’s mother told me she loved the hat and mittens I gave her in February.

I was hoping to get a picture of her wearing them but that didn’t happen.

Goodbye, Carole.

It feels like such a long time

Ever notice that when you don’t feel 100%, that time either stands still or goes by so quickly you forget what year it is?!

Just me? Alright.

I have no idea what’s been happening in the world for the past two weeks. I assume it’s still in the same mess. I have made it through to the other side of Covid.

My brain is still a bit addled and I have a hard time concentrating on some things but all in all, I’m doing much better.

I haven’t touched my socks for two weeks. Fortunately, I kept good notes so I’m going to attempt the gusset section on the second toe-up sock.

Wish me luck!

Double Moss toe up socks

I was having some issues with my wrist and couldn’t knit for several days. Whatever it was went away.

The overdyed green yarn was calling to me so I decided to cast on a toe-up sock. I’ve knit two pairs of toe-up socks and once I get through the first 4-5 rounds of the toe, I’m good to go. No picking up stitches at the gusset and no Kitchener stitch at the toe (though I don’t really mind that part).

First sock progress came to an abrupt halt when I had to untangle a huge knot. This picture was taken after fiddling with it for 40 minutes.

Another 15 minutes and it was all untangled and I could get back to knitting the leg.

I know some people who would have 1.) cut the knot out of the yarn or 2.) chucked the entire mess into the wastebasket. My grandmother was thrifty/frugal and salvaged many a ball of yarn in her lifetime so I channeled some of the Emma-untangling superpowers and managed to extricate the yarn from its prison.

This sock is now waiting for its mate and I am having a heck of a time starting the toe.* I’m using Judy’s Magic Cast-on and double-point needles as I don’t have any US#1.5 circulars longer than 24-inches. Any tips, tricks, or techniques that will get me through this part are most welcome.

* I figured out what I was doing wrong so the toe is coming along just fine now. 😉

Patti