Holey toes

Hand-knitted socks deserve to be repaired.  We spend hours knitting them so a hole, especially in the toe area, can be and should be fixed.

Last September Mr. Aitch and I took a motorcycle ride to Blackwater Falls near Canaan Valley, West Virginia.  It was a beautiful day to ride.  Mr. Aitch and I hiked down the 200+ steps to view the falls and then back up again only to discover that I dropped my denim jacket somewhere along the trail.

See, no jacket flopped over my purse.

About three-quarters of the way down I finally found it along the path.  Up I trudged to the top of the trail where Mr. Aitch and I guzzled a bottle of water.

With proper footwear the boardwalk and steps are no problem at all but we were both wearing our motorcycle gear including leather boots.

Once we returned home and I removed my boots, I discovered a hole in one sock and the beginnings of a hole in the toe of the other one.  I hand washed them and promptly forgot about them until last weekend.

It was time to get these back in my sock drawer or better yet, on my feet.  With the newest pair of socks completed and an empty knitting needle, I tackled the repairs.

Even though the yarn is a superwash wool, the toe area felted on the inside as I soon found out while trying (unsuccessfully) to unravel the toe. I ended up securing the stitches with some double-points and cut off the end of the toe.  This process took me well over an hour!

I still had some of the yarn leftover from when I made these socks and quickly reknit the toe of the one sock.

The second toe was easier as I shoved my darning egg into the toe and did a kind of weaving over the thin area to prevent a hole. 

Not perfect but good enough.

When I gift socks. I  include 1-2 yards of yarn in case a hole appears and I try to remember to tell the recipient that I will gladly (?!) repair any damaged socks.

Do you repair you holey hand-knit socks, toss them, or save and never wear them?

Patti

Curling mist

Helen Stewart’s Handmade Sock Society season 4 got underway earlier this month.  The first sock pattern, Curling Mist, was a joy to knit with an all-around texture.

(c) Helen Stewart

Knit Picks Hawthorne Multi yarn in the Cully colorway (color discontinued) is a soft green with hints of blue.yarn colorwayI pretty much followed the pattern except for the heel flap.  I have two favorite patterns that I like to use: the Slip-stitch heel flap and the Eye of Partridge heel flap.  I decided on the slip-stitch one as it would flow better from the ribbed pattern into the heel flap.

Helen suggested in her pattern to reverse the cabling from leaning to the right to the left for the second sock so they would be mirror images.  So I did that as well.

The socks fit my feet perfectly.

Isn’t it funny that you can look and look and look at something and not see a missed stitch until you have a picture of it?

And with that missed cable crossing (oops) I will keep these for myself.

Do you have works-in-progress or finished anything lately?

Patti

The dropped stitch

I am 99.99% sure that I dropped a stitch on the bottom of Jayne’s first sock when I photographed it to show my progress. Of course, I didn’t realize that until I was ready to graft the toe together and found I was short one stitch.  And I didn’t see it until I was ready to change from the mini circular needle to the double-point needles on the second sock to knit the toe. Click here for a better explanation of using circular vs. double-pointed needles for socks.

I wanted to get right on with the second sock and graft the toe of the first sock later, like in the morning with natural daylight.  Well, one thing led to another and I didn’t graft the toe until I needed those double-pointed needles to finish the second sock toe.

And that’s when I discovered the dropped stitch.  Way down on the heel/foot.  Tacking the stitch would cause a small but annoying bump that would feel like a large grain of sand with each and every step.

It’s that purple stitch.  Right there.

No, I didn’t rip out down to the offending stitch but picked up and knit that stitch all the way to where the toe section began.

It made a bit of a ridge on the bottom of the foot but I’m ready to finish the toe again, weave in the ends, and call them done.

I’m hoping the yarn ridge will relax somewhat and fix itself when I soak the finished socks.  Or am I kidding myself?

Patti

Jayne’s sock

After last week’s yarn dyeing adventure, I balled up the yarn and began the Dorsal Fin socks for my granddaughter.

The yarn was pooling a bit in the cuff area but I soldiered on and the colors sorted themselves out on the leg.

The detail that runs up/down the back of the leg is not as visible because of the colors but it might stand out more when wearing.

The heel is turned and the gusset is almost finished. It’s just plain old knitting the rest of the foot and toe. This sock will be finished this week and the second sock started.

My progress was slowed down last week as I was digging and moving some large rocks around the deck and my hands ached too much to knit.  But that’s another story.Patti