It feels like such a long time

Ever notice that when you don’t feel 100%, that time either stands still or goes by so quickly you forget what year it is?!

Just me? Alright.

I have no idea what’s been happening in the world for the past two weeks. I assume it’s still in the same mess. I have made it through to the other side of Covid.

My brain is still a bit addled and I have a hard time concentrating on some things but all in all, I’m doing much better.

I haven’t touched my socks for two weeks. Fortunately, I kept good notes so I’m going to attempt the gusset section on the second toe-up sock.

Wish me luck!

Double Moss toe up socks

I was having some issues with my wrist and couldn’t knit for several days. Whatever it was went away.

The overdyed green yarn was calling to me so I decided to cast on a toe-up sock. I’ve knit two pairs of toe-up socks and once I get through the first 4-5 rounds of the toe, I’m good to go. No picking up stitches at the gusset and no Kitchener stitch at the toe (though I don’t really mind that part).

First sock progress came to an abrupt halt when I had to untangle a huge knot. This picture was taken after fiddling with it for 40 minutes.

Another 15 minutes and it was all untangled and I could get back to knitting the leg.

I know some people who would have 1.) cut the knot out of the yarn or 2.) chucked the entire mess into the wastebasket. My grandmother was thrifty/frugal and salvaged many a ball of yarn in her lifetime so I channeled some of the Emma-untangling superpowers and managed to extricate the yarn from its prison.

This sock is now waiting for its mate and I am having a heck of a time starting the toe.* I’m using Judy’s Magic Cast-on and double-point needles as I don’t have any US#1.5 circulars longer than 24-inches. Any tips, tricks, or techniques that will get me through this part are most welcome.

* I figured out what I was doing wrong so the toe is coming along just fine now. 😉

Patti

Not sure

I finished three pairs of socks so far this year and I do plan on posting about them. But not today.

I started another pair on Saturday and I’m not sure if I should continue, rip back to the ribbing, or completely start over.

Is it the hand-painted color of yarn?

The textured pattern?

Or a combination of both that is causing the lack of enthusiasm?

Lesson learned

Thank you for the encouragement! I did finish the January Mittens (Ravelry link) on February 1st.

Notes: Yarn: worsted weight – Lion Brand Wool-Ease in charcoal (48 g) and Caron Simply Soft in ivory (50g). Needles: cuff US #1.5 (2.5mm), body US # 2.5 (3mm).

Right mitten – December 11, 2021 – December 26, 2021 using double point needles

Left mitten – January 11, 2022 – February 1, 2022 using circular needles

Modifications: Thumb gusset added while knitting. Thumb was finished after body.

Worsted weight yarn on such small needles (think toothpick size in diameter) hurt my hands. I think that was why I was so reluctant in getting these finished. Plus I was also finishing one pair of socks and starting another pair as well. I am not a monogamous knitter.

But I did it! Yay me!

You may have noticed that I changed the direction of the Latvian Braid on the cuff.

But the GLARING difference is the yarn dominance on the thumbs.

It’s all about which yarn is held above and which is held below as to the color that is more dominant. The ivory yarn was held below the charcoal when I knit the right thumb so the ivory is more dominant. The charcoal yarn was below the ivory on the left thumb.

Yarn dominance occurs because one yarn’s strand travels slightly farther than the other, making it slightly tighter, causing it to recede, and be less dominant. The yarn traveling the shortest distance is the dominant yarn.

Interweave

If you are interested, here’s a link to a short video on yarn dominance that explains this technique by Beth Brown Reinsel.

The ivory yarn was the dominant yarn on the back of the hand as I wanted the design to stand out but I reversed the yarn dominance on the palm. I wanted the ivory to be in the background and the charcoal to stand out more.

I didn’t write down which yarn was dominant when I knit the thumbs.

It’s a lesson I hope I will remember in the future. Or I could wait and knit both thumbs one right after the other.

Patti