Chairs

Both chairs are finished.  The colors aren’t that true and I can’t seem to get the right adjustments to make them more realistic.  The yellowish-green is more of a chartreuse green and the blues have more depth.

Rita’s chair: Done!  This is now my knitting chair as it sits in the corner.

And here it is in front of the window.  iPad Aunt’s chair resides there now.

iPad Aunt’s chair: Done but not happy with the cushion.  I didn’t wrap the new foam in Dacron before stuffing it into the cover.  It looks too boxy and I need to fix that.  Plus the seat cushion looks too big for the chair but it’s not that way in real life.

Both chairs side-by-side.  You can see that they are very similar but different.  Rita’s chair has a lower part on the bottom front, straight-arm stump, and is a smaller chair.  iPad Aunt’s chair is straight across the bottom front, has a curved arm stump, and is a wider chair.

I tried very hard to get the patterns to match up on both chairs but it was very difficult.  The pattern was 24 inch vertical repeat so I tried not to waste fabric.

I am in the process of redoing the ottoman that matches Rita’s chair but that is on hold for now.  Too many irons in the fire.

And here it sits

…minus the cushion.

I’m rushing this final part and as a result it’s been ripped apart twice.  And now for a third time.

I’m following the original cushion construction and taking a shortcut that the manufacturer took by skipping a step.

Instead of making a separate welting cord, they sewed the cording for the welting into the gusset and then sewed the gusset to the top and bottom.

Matching the top and bottom with the gusset in between is a challenge when the gusset is stiff due to the welting.  I’m not getting clean corners.

See how the fabric weave is not on the straight grain?  That’s a big problem.  So I’m ripping it out.  Again.  And will make welting cord the right way and sew it onto the top and bottom of the cushion cover.  Then I’ll sew the gusset by marking each corner.

As my grandmother used to say, “If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right.”  Sorry Gram, it’s taking me three times to remember that.

Selling myself short

Jude commented on Casting off another way

 

First of all….those look VERY complicated to even think about doing. You are excellent at your craft. Those mitts should be worth about 80$ or more if someone were to purchase them.!!!

I do it all the time.  Well, when someone asks me to knit something for them and then asks how much I would charge.

I had no problem coming up with a price for a crocheted item a friend of mine made for someone else.  She asked me for my opinion and said with the time invested and cost of the yarn, I wouldn’t charge less than $35.  And she did.  And the person paid the price.

A friend commissioned me to make the Drinkers Mitts for her and I gave her a price.  A very low price. It’s not high enough for the amount of work involved but I felt bad charging what I would charge a complete stranger.

Do you charge a flat fee?  Do you use some type of formula to come up with a price?  Or do you sell yourself short?

Making it mine

My friend commissioned a box bag.  I emailed her some fabric choices and she told me what she liked but to surprise her with the final selection.

So I experimented with a two-tone bag.

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I like to coordinate the lining with the outer prints and didn’t want to run to the fabric store (only to be disappointed).

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So I printed my own.

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With a star rubber stamp and Sharpie “Stained” fabric marker.

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Random stars on plain fabric.

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I love how it turned out.

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Added a little bling and a care tag.

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