HD bag

Most hotels offer hairdryers in their guest rooms.  But many times when staying with family or friends, a hairdryer might not be available when you need it.  So when Mr. Aitch and I traveled across the country this past summer, we bought a small hairdryer to take with us for those times when we didn’t stay in a hotel.

The hairdryer was attached to the wall in some hotels but some were in a cloth bag on or under the sink area.  That gave me an idea for our “travel” hairdryer.

I made a simple drawstring bag to protect it in our suitcase and make it easy to find.

Two fat-quarters and a length of cotton cord later and I called it done.

Cotton for the outside and a piece of heavy flannel for the inside.  French seams keep it neat (no exposed seams).  A piece of batting sandwiched between the outer and inner fabrics and/or quilting would offer more padding but I didn’t think of it at the time.

This will stay in our guest bathroom when we’re home but can go with us at a moments notice.

Vacation yarn

One of my vacation goals was to purchase a souvenir yarn from each state that we visited.  That didn’t quite work out as the only yarn I bought was from The Joy of Knitting in Franklin, Tennessee.

Lana Grossa Lace Lux.  One skein – 50g – 339 yards (310m), color 42 which is a silvery dark grey. 

The label was a bit shopworn but I couldn’t resist the color.

I’m thinking it will become Maluka.

Another knitter in the family

Mr. Aitch and I visited with our son and his family while on our vacation

This was the first time that we met our daughter-in-law in person.  She is a delight, very down to earth, generous, super nice and a knitter.

She and I were both pleasantly surprised to learn that we were both knitters.

When my grandmother taught me to knit, it was (what I’ve since discovered) in the “cottage” style of knitting where the knitter would prop the right needle against their hip/waist/underarm for support and move the left needle.  Circular needles don’t offer that type of support.  Dpns don’t really allow for that either as they are usually 5-8 inches long.  Plus they are pretty thin (US 0-2) and very pointy.  Sometimes I stick one end of the dpn into a wine cork so I can still support the sharp point against my body and not poke holes through my clothes (or skin).  I just need to remember to move it as I knit from one needle to the next.

My daughter-in-law has mastered the two-at-a-time socks on circular needles.  I am a double point needle (dpn) sock knitter, however, I want to learn this technique.  During our visit, she gave me two sock knitting books:

The Sock à la Carte (c) 2008 by Jonelle Raffino, Katherine Cade and the SWTC Staff is so unique. 

The book has 17 cuff patterns, 20 body patterns and 18 heel and toe patterns that one can mix and match to create hundreds of different socks.

Part of the book contains flip pages to design your own unique combinations for the cuff, body, heel and toe that refer back to the directions for each section.

The other book 2-at-a-Time Socks (c) 2007 by Melissa Morgan-Oates explains the technique so well that I am going to give it a go. 

With 17 sock patterns included (and the patterns in the other book), I will have many to choose from for my first pair…just as soon as I finish more on my To-Do list.

Are you a sock knitter?  Do you use double point needles, circular needles, 2-at-a-time, or knit flat socks and seam?