Vanilla ROY Artist socks

The socks for the Artist just flew off my needles. I’m not sure if it was the vibrant colors, the simple sock pattern, or my knitting Mojo.

Z's R-O-Y socks

I cast on sock #1 on July 28 and finished sock #2 Monday evening…except for grafting the toe as I try to do that in the morning when my brain is rested.

This was hand-dyed yarn from the marathon dyeing session at the end of June.

The colors remind me of tropical fruits: pineapple. mango, papaya, and coconut. Refreshing colors on hot summer days.

Z's R-O-Y heel

The pattern was a basic top-down sock in plain stockinette stitch that really showed off the colors and an Eye of Partridge heel flap.

Z's R-O-Y toes

Once again to save as much of the hand-dyed yarn, I knit the toes in a contrasting color. This time it was Knit Picks Stroll fingering weight in Scarlet.

E and Z socks

These two pairs are off to Colorado to the Artist and the Princess.

Next up are socks for the Karate Kid…just as soon as I finish a sewing project.

Have you finished anything lately?

Patti

Dyeing adventures

Our Colorado family visited us at the end of June. It had been 944 days since we saw them in person. That’s just too long.

Besides going on a hike to Blackwater Falls, visiting Geroge Washington’s headquarters, eating ice cream, having a picnic, painting rocks, celebrating our wedding anniversaries (Daughter and S-I-L 15 years, Mr. Atich and myself 48 years!), and rock painting, we also dyed yarn!

Surprise, surprise!

Using the Crockpot method, we dyed six skeins (100 grams each) of fingering weight yarn in total, the most I’ve ever done at one time. [I did purchase a small microwave (specifically for dyeing/setting the dyes) the morning we dyed but didn’t have time to get it unpacked and ready to use.] For the most part, we used food coloring and Easter egg dyes but I did use some Jacquard dyes in Brillant Blue and Jet Black to add colors. I’m getting low on the Easter egg dyes.

The Karate Kid chose greens and blues.

The Princess chose red and purple. I didn’t add enough white vinegar to the water so as soon as the purple dye hit the wet yarn, it broke into pink and blue. She loved it so we continued.

The Artist wanted reds, oranges, and yellows. The red wasn’t as intense as we thought as a lot of it washed out.

She also used some leftover red and black and a mixture of those for a black cherry hue for this skein.

My daughter used red, blue, and purple with a few spots of lime green.

Lastly, the Karate Kid and I dribbled all of the leftover dyes down the sides of the Crockpot and just let it sit in hot water until all the dye was absorbed.

The final group all in a row.

Each will get at least one pair of socks. That’s a lot of knitting time for me!

I do have a question for any dyers out there: How much dye do you use in what amount of water to make your dye stock? I think I use too much dye and/or too little water as I’m seeing too much color go down the drain while rinsing.

Patti

It feels like such a long time

Ever notice that when you don’t feel 100%, that time either stands still or goes by so quickly you forget what year it is?!

Just me? Alright.

I have no idea what’s been happening in the world for the past two weeks. I assume it’s still in the same mess. I have made it through to the other side of Covid.

My brain is still a bit addled and I have a hard time concentrating on some things but all in all, I’m doing much better.

I haven’t touched my socks for two weeks. Fortunately, I kept good notes so I’m going to attempt the gusset section on the second toe-up sock.

Wish me luck!

Double Moss toe up socks

I was having some issues with my wrist and couldn’t knit for several days. Whatever it was went away.

The overdyed green yarn was calling to me so I decided to cast on a toe-up sock. I’ve knit two pairs of toe-up socks and once I get through the first 4-5 rounds of the toe, I’m good to go. No picking up stitches at the gusset and no Kitchener stitch at the toe (though I don’t really mind that part).

First sock progress came to an abrupt halt when I had to untangle a huge knot. This picture was taken after fiddling with it for 40 minutes.

Another 15 minutes and it was all untangled and I could get back to knitting the leg.

I know some people who would have 1.) cut the knot out of the yarn or 2.) chucked the entire mess into the wastebasket. My grandmother was thrifty/frugal and salvaged many a ball of yarn in her lifetime so I channeled some of the Emma-untangling superpowers and managed to extricate the yarn from its prison.

This sock is now waiting for its mate and I am having a heck of a time starting the toe.* I’m using Judy’s Magic Cast-on and double-point needles as I don’t have any US#1.5 circulars longer than 24-inches. Any tips, tricks, or techniques that will get me through this part are most welcome.

* I figured out what I was doing wrong so the toe is coming along just fine now. 😉

Patti