Knitted gifts

You remember the 1898 knitted cap I made for Mr. Aitch with overdyed yarn?  Well, it needed some fingerless gloves for company.

I didn’t have enough yarn leftover and I knew I’d never get the same color to match.  That’s why it’s important to get enough of the same dye lot when knitting (or crocheting) any yarny project.  So I overdyed another skein of yarn but starting out with a totally different color.

Using the same brand of yarn and the same food dye colors, I wanted to get something that would coordinate with the original overdye.

I added some leftover Rit dye, a mixture of blue and black, from another project.  The blue and green food coloring just wasn’t covering that bright coral color.

Close enough for a contrast but still in the same family.

Original overdye

The new overdye

The fingerless glove pattern is the Don’t skid, honey! by Justyna Lorkowska.  The zigzags reminded me of smoke and Mr. Aitch needed a new pair to keep his hands warm when he smokes a cigar (in the garage in the winter). 

You can see the two colors on the palm.

Both together.

We’ve had some bitter cold temperature here lately and Mr. Aitch has worn the gloves inside to keep his hands warm while at the computer.

 

 

Another overdye

I started with this yarn: Cleckheaton Country 8-ply 100% washable wool in a very beautiful purple color.  But not for a man or at least not the men I know and would knit for.

Enter food coloring, vinegar, squirt bottles and a microwave.

I decided to dye all three of the full skeins that I had because I didn’t think I would use the yarn as it was.  And because I wanted to.

I used basically the same process as I did here.  You can do an internet search for other methods.  After soaking the yarn in a vinegar bath for about 30 minutes, I alternated squirting the dye between shades of blue, shades of green, and a mixture of both. (Sorry no pictures of the process.)  I didn’t want a solid color so I squirted some parts with just the green, some with the blue, and some with a combo of both.

Once completely saturated the yarn was wrapped in plastic, placed in a glass casserole dish and nuked for two minutes, rested for two minutes and so on for about four sessions total.

The yarn was rinsed after it cooled until the water ran clear and colorless.

Here it is after it dried. This reminds me of the ocean…blues, greens and a bit of the purple shows through.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I couldn’t wait to begin another project.  This time it’s the 1898 hat by Kristin Byrnes as posted on the Christmas at Sea|The Seamen’s Church Institute website.  Scroll down on the linked page for many free patterns.  I should be able to knit two hats with the amount of yarn that I overdyed.

Most of my wool yarn is not machine washable but I might need to change that…

Overdye

At least that’s what I think it’s called.

This is not directly a knitting post but I know there are many knitters that dye yarn.  I have a dye question.

I have a wonderful denim wrap skirt.  It fits great, is A-line, is the right length, has the nicest buttons.  And is age appropriate.  I love everything about it.  Except the color.

Denim skirt

Not a good picture but it’s the only one I have available right now.

It’s too light.  It’s a washed-out denim.

I’d like to dye it a darker blue but have little experience in dyeing anything other than Easter eggs and the tie-dye T-shirts we did in art class.

My biggest fear is that I will ruin it forever.  I will wear it as it is now but if I could change make it darker, I would.  If it comes out a yucky blue, I’ll be very upset.

It has a little bit of metal on it so “curing” it in the microwave is out.

Have you ever dyed anything successfully?  Help!