Weekend yarn dyeing part 2

As long as I had the dye materials out, I hand-painted a skein of yarn myself.  I used the leftover teal dye my granddaughter used along with green and yellow.  The green had a few drops of yellow added to it and the yellow had two-three drops of McCormick’s Neon lime green food coloring mixed in.  I also dropped some right-out-of-the-bottle yellow down the center of the yellow sections and random drops of the neon green elsewhere just because I wanted less white yarn showing.  Could I repeat the process?  Absolutely not!blue, green, yellow hand-painted yarn

The dye was not placed in even sections around the oval on purpose.  It took a lot of rinsing to get the water to run clear.blue, green, yellow hand-painted yarn

I’m loving the end result.blue, green, yellow hand-painted yarn

I have 100 grams/462 yards of this fingering weight yarn and no idea what to make with it.blue, green, yellow hand-painted yarn

My winter coat is yellow and a triangular or crescent-shaped scarf/shawl would be a welcome addition to brighten up the dreary winter days.  Or maybe socks?  Or possibly gloves?  I’m just not sure…

Patti

 

Hand painting yarn

I hand painted/dyed a 100-gram skein of Knit Picks Stroll Bare (undyed fingering yarn) using Paas Easter egg dyes and some blue food coloring.

Hand painting means to apply the dye by hand rather than submerge the yarn in a dye bath.  Dyeing by hand is less predictable and is nearly impossible to replicate than other types of dyeing.  Submerging yarn (or fabric) in a large dyepot or vat can be reproduced as the dye penetrates the fibers in a more uniform manner.

The fixative for setting this dye is acid i.e. white vinegar.  I just followed the instructions for the ratio of vinegar to water:  Three tablespoons of vinegar to dissolve the dye pellets to 1/2 cup water.  I used 2-3 dye pellets per 1/2 cup water to get more intense colors.



After the yarn was saturated with color, I wrapped the yarn in plastic wrap and nuked it 2-3 minutes at a time and allowing it to cool between so as not to scorch or burn the yarn.  Once it came out of the microwave sizzling, I let it cool before rinsing it in warm to then cool water till it ran clear.  It turned out beautifully.

A lovely mix of blues, greens, and a hint of purple.

But I wanted deeper colors for the Cliff Walk socks.  The Midnight Heather and black were just too dark for my aging eyes.

Back into the dye pot, or rather the dye plastic wrap/microwave.  One of these days I will find a large enough pot that I can dedicate to dyeing.  That day hasn’t arrived yet.

This time I used blue, purple and red dye pellets.  I think I went overboard with the red though I only used one tablet mixed with a blue one and a purple one.  I mixed up three different iterations of the dyes and squirted them using one bottle without washing it in between colors.

I like this much better for socks.  The red isn’t as intense as it looks here.

I can still see variations of the original teals and blues.

Another dip in just blue would probably tone down the reddish purple but at this point, I am done experimenting with the yarn.

I just want to knit it up!

Second try

The Handmade Sock Society third pattern, Cliff Walk, is beautiful.  But the yarn I chose is not working with this pattern.

The color is pooling and the stitches are obscured.

It’s almost a swirling design.

Plus I’m not enjoying the feel of the yarn while knitting, nor the finished part so far.  It’s coarse and not soft.  Maybe that’s due to the cotton content.  I don’t know.

But I DO know that I will begin anew with a different yarn.  My old stand-by: Knit Picks Stroll.  Midnight Heather is a rich deep blue.  (I’d rather use a tonal but I don’t have any in my stash that I’m willing to use for socks.  The yardage for those yarns is enough for some shawls and I’d hate to use some and not have enough for later.)

I only have 56 grams in this dye lot and will need about 70-80 grams.  I might use black for the cuffs, heels, and toes…

…or dye some Knit Picks Stroll Bare that I do have in my stash.

Such a bother

I cut the tip of my index finger on my right hand last week and I can’t seem to get anything done…well, stuff that I want to do.

It’s not a deep cut or a long cut just the sort that gets in the way because it needs covered.  

I’m an English style knitter where the yarn is held in my right hand as opposed to a continental style where the yarn is held in the left hand.  I “can” knit continental but it’s not that intuitive for me.  Or fun.  Plus I have one more fingerless mitt to finish and my gauge would definitely be off if I changed styles now.  And bandages just get in the way.  So no knitting for me.

But I could dye some yarn…