Dyed frog

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I decided to rip out that sock and redye the yarn. It was one of three 100 gram-skeins/hanks of yarn that I dyed in the crock-pot last year (and never blogged about). The other two turned out great and I’ve knitted one already into a pair of socks.

I was cleaning out parts of the basement last summer and lo and behold I found packets of dye! Sunshine Crafts Batik dyes. Let’s just say I acquired these a long, long, long time ago in a place far away. Along with my fantastic find, I also bought some professional Jacquard dyes in some basic colors.

This is my first foray into using dyes other than food coloring and Easter egg dye and it was a great experience. In the future, I will reread the ratios of dye to water. I just winged it when I mixed the dye and the two colors were VERY concentrated giving deep, intense hues.

My original plan was to use Azure blue and Brilliant blue. I swapped out Jet back for the Brilliant blue as the Azure was blue enough.

It was warm enough last week to set my amateurish dye station on the picnic table outside. Mr. Aitch does not like the smell of wet wool and vinegar so all my dyeing is now done either in the garage or outside. And no microwave dyeing either.

L to R: Crock-pot, white vinegar, H2O, dyeing spoons, dyes, syringes, yarn, dye mixing tub, gloves.

I soaked the yarn in a water/vinegar solution overnight. In the morning I twisted the yarn so I would retain some of the lime green colors and the blues and black would blend together into a navy blue with some teal areas.

Then I placed it in my cold crock-pot with enough water and a slog of vinegar to cover. The acid in the vinegar helps the fiber to absorb the dye. It took over two hours for the water to get hot enough before I could add any dye!

Oops, I forgot to twist the yarn! The heat is on

Once everything was ready I loaded up syringes with the blue and black dyes and squirted it into the twisted skein. The dye struck almost instantly as I probably had too much vinegar in the dye mixture.

I played with adding dye in various places for about an hour. Mr. Aitch helped photograph with yarn when I checked it before untwisting it. Too much lime green was still visible so I kept squirting dye onto those areas.

The yarn sat in the dye bath until the water was clear. Then the impatient me had to wait until the yarn was cool enough to rinse. Because the dye was so concentrated, it took a long time to rinse out the extra dye…(no showers for me for at least a week! Just kidding)

Clear water. All the dye is absorbed.

The finished product.

Even though it’s not what I planned, I still love it.

The colors are so rich and varied.

Socks for sure! It takes about 65-75 grams of yarn for a pair of knit socks. I will have some leftover to use as an accent toe/heel, add with another yarn for striped socks, or the slipped stitch socks I love to knit.

Patti

Not sure

I finished three pairs of socks so far this year and I do plan on posting about them. But not today.

I started another pair on Saturday and I’m not sure if I should continue, rip back to the ribbing, or completely start over.

Is it the hand-painted color of yarn?

The textured pattern?

Or a combination of both that is causing the lack of enthusiasm?

Pucker up

I’m sending family and friends some lip balm and chocolate hearts for Valentine’s Day. I love the tinted lip balm as it is very sheer and helps protect lips from drying out. Perfect combination. I also got some “regular” lip balm for the guys since they aren’t the type to use a tint.

I used tape donuts on the backs of the wrapped chocolate hearts and attached them to the card surrounding the lip balm. Then I printed out some strips of paper with Valentine-themed images and wrapped those around the bundle sealing the strips with taps.

Want to print your own? Click here and here for the pdf. These wraps will also fit around a candy bar.

How do you celebrate Valentine’s Day?

Patti

2008-2022

At my last paying job (before I retired) our office moved in 2008 to a new location. While cleaning out and tossing old stuff, I found 15-20 reams of pre-printed letterhead. That’s a lot of paper. The logo and business name were at the top and the address was printed at the bottom. But the back was pristine. Obviously, we weren’t going to be able to use it with the old address printed on it. I asked my boss what I should do about all that paper. She said she didn’t want to move it and to see if anyone wanted it. I think a few people in the office each took a ream but we were left with lots of letft over.

Not being one to waste anything (thanks Mom) and with permission, I brought the rest home with me. We used it in our home printer for things we wanted to print but not important enough to use the “good” paper. I used the paper to print off maps and directions, templates, knitting patterns, sewing patterns, and much more. I cut off the tops and bottoms and used the middle sections for notes and stationery.

When grandkids entered the picture, I gave a ream to my son’s children and a ream or two to my daughter. They loved endless amounts of paper to draw or write on. My daughter used the last of that paper in 2020 when the schools were closed and she needed to print off worksheets for her children.

Our supply ran out yesterday.

But fear not as I have more backup scrap/printer paper! My mother gave me a box of assorted colors of printer paper many years ago. Paper dries out and gets crumbly with age so we might as well use it or lose it.

Patti